s_nya

S_nya’s “one.” celebrates Black solidarity in the Missoula community through bounding and engaged hip-hop beats. Cole Bronson is 23 years old and originally from Portland, Oregon, but he has been playing music in Missoula for the past three years. He is an emotive drummer and plays in an assortment of jazz and funk ensembles. He also has an empathic knack for producing hip-hop beats tailored perfectly for each local hip-hop artist’s individual style. We sat down to talk with S_nya about his own afrofuturistic sound collage project.

Montana Kaimin: What does “one.” mean to you?

S_nya: “one.” is Black unity and solidarity. There is crazy shit that happens to us sometimes, and we just need to talk about it. It happens to be my first project too. 

MK: What is afrofuturism?

S_nya: The idea of Black people are alien or treated as alien. The ideology was that Black people don’t belong on planet earth so we needed to go to another planet to escape. It is super powerful to imagine a utopian Black society. The album goes all the way to the past and projects all the way to the future. I pictured Black people gathering and boarding spaceships and flying to new worlds. You see how it is one-in-the-same, from the ground up, landing on a new planet and restarting a civilization is synonymous with what we did as ancient humans. 

MK: How have you rooted in your own culture and identity in this work?

S_nya: It is a constant learning experience. Continuing to learn about it is really gratifying. It is coming to terms with how I perceive myself, that imagination: what is Black? It could be so many things. 

MK: What do you hope for the future of Missoula’s music scene?

S_nya: Missoula music gets stagnant. It is a lot of white dudes, a lot of the same kind of music, a bunch of bluegrass, psych rock is sweet, but so saturated. Whether or not they recognize diversity as necessary, a lot of people don’t understand. They know what bands are gonna bring people in and aren't taking a chance on something new. I want to push a hip-hop collective, push producers collaborating, more of a collective mentality. There is enough talent that could generate attention from regional or even national spinners and producers. We need to congregate. We need more culture, different perspectives and different ways of expression. 

MK: If there is one message in your music that you need Missoula to hear, what would that be?

S_nya: That Black just might not be what you think it is. What you know about Black people and Black history definitely isn't what you think it is. Hip-hop is not just hype, but it can be deep and have a message. Black unity is important, that message is powerful. Same with all the racial and social struggles for women and queer people, too. Representing yourself through art can have a powerful message and can make people rethink. 

 

S_nya’s “one.” celebrates Black solidarity in the Missoula community through bounding and engaged hip-hop beats. Cole Bronson is 23 years old and originally from Portland, Oregon, but he has been playing music in Missoula for the past three years. He is an emotive drummer and plays in an assortment of jazz and funk ensembles. He also has an empathic knack for producing hip-hop beats tailored perfectly for each local hip-hop artist’s individual style. We sat down to talk with S_nya about his own afrofuturistic sound collage project.

Montana Kaimin:What does “one.” mean to you?

S_nya: “one.” is Black unity and solidarity. There is crazy shit that happens to us sometimes, and we just need to talk about it. It happens to be my first project too. 

MK: What is afrofuturism?

S_nya: The idea of Black people are alien or treated as alien. The ideology was that Black people don’t belong on planet earth so we needed to go to another planet to escape. It is super powerful to imagine a utopian Black society. The album goes all the way to the past and projects all the way to the future. I pictured Black people gathering and boarding spaceships and flying to new worlds. You see how it is one-in-the-same, from the ground up, landing on a new planet and restarting a civilization is synonymous with what we did as ancient humans. 

MK: How have you rooted in your own culture and identity in this work?

S_nya: It is a constant learning experience. Continuing to learn about it is really gratifying. It is coming to terms with how I perceive myself, that imagination: what is Black? It could be so many things. 

MK: What do you hope for the future of Missoula’s music scene?

S_nya: Missoula music gets stagnant. It is a lot of white dudes, a lot of the same kind of music, a bunch of bluegrass, psych rock is sweet, but so saturated. Whether or not they recognize diversity as necessary, a lot of people don’t understand. They know what bands are gonna bring people in and aren't taking a chance on something new. I want to push a hip-hop collective, push producers collaborating, more of a collective mentality. There is enough talent that could generate attention from regional or even national spinners and producers. We need to congregate. We need more culture, different perspectives and different ways of expression. 

MK: If there is one message in your music that you need Missoula to hear, what would that be?

S_nya: That Black just might not be what you think it is. What you know about Black people and Black history definitely isn't what you think it is. Hip-hop is not just hype, but it can be deep and have a message. Black unity is important, that message is powerful. Same with all the racial and social struggles for women and queer people, too. Representing yourself through art can have a powerful message and can make people rethink. 

 

S_nya’s “one.” celebrates Black solidarity in the Missoula community through bounding and engaged hip-hop beats. Cole Bronson is 23 years old and originally from Portland, Oregon, but he has been playing music in Missoula for the past three years. He is an emotive drummer and plays in an assortment of jazz and funk ensembles. He also has an empathic knack for producing hip-hop beats tailored perfectly for each local hip-hop artist’s individual style. We sat down to talk with S_nya about his own afrofuturistic sound collage project.

Montana Kaimin:What does “one.” mean to you?

S_nya: “one.” is Black unity and solidarity. There is crazy shit that happens to us sometimes, and we just need to talk about it. It happens to be my first project too. 

MK: What is afrofuturism?

S_nya: The idea of Black people are alien or treated as alien. The ideology was that Black people don’t belong on planet earth so we needed to go to another planet to escape. It is super powerful to imagine a utopian Black society. The album goes all the way to the past and projects all the way to the future. I pictured Black people gathering and boarding spaceships and flying to new worlds. You see how it is one-in-the-same, from the ground up, landing on a new planet and restarting a civilization is synonymous with what we did as ancient humans. 

MK: How have you rooted in your own culture and identity in this work?

S_nya: It is a constant learning experience. Continuing to learn about it is really gratifying. It is coming to terms with how I perceive myself, that imagination: what is Black? It could be so many things. 

MK: What do you hope for the future of Missoula’s music scene?

S_nya: Missoula music gets stagnant. It is a lot of white dudes, a lot of the same kind of music, a bunch of bluegrass, psych rock is sweet, but so saturated. Whether or not they recognize diversity as necessary, a lot of people don’t understand. They know what bands are gonna bring people in and aren't taking a chance on something new. I want to push a hip-hop collective, push producers collaborating, more of a collective mentality. There is enough talent that could generate attention from regional or even national spinners and producers. We need to congregate. We need more culture, different perspectives and different ways of expression. 

MK: If there is one message in your music that you need Missoula to hear, what would that be?

S_nya: That Black just might not be what you think it is. What you know about Black people and Black history definitely isn't what you think it is. Hip-hop is not just hype, but it can be deep and have a message. Black unity is important, that message is powerful. Same with all the racial and social struggles for women and queer people, too. Representing yourself through art can have a powerful message and can make people rethink. 

 

S_nya’s “one.” celebrates Black solidarity in the Missoula community through bounding and engaged hip-hop beats. Cole Bronson is 23 years old and originally from Portland, Oregon, but he has been playing music in Missoula for the past three years. He is an emotive drummer and plays in an assortment of jazz and funk ensembles. He also has an empathic knack for producing hip-hop beats tailored perfectly for each local hip-hop artist’s individual style. We sat down to talk with S_nya about his own afrofuturistic sound collage project.

Montana Kaimin:What does “one.” mean to you?

S_nya: “one.” is Black unity and solidarity. There is crazy shit that happens to us sometimes, and we just need to talk about it. It happens to be my first project too. 

MK: What is afrofuturism?

S_nya: The idea of Black people are alien or treated as alien. The ideology was that Black people don’t belong on planet earth so we needed to go to another planet to escape. It is super powerful to imagine a utopian Black society. The album goes all the way to the past and projects all the way to the future. I pictured Black people gathering and boarding spaceships and flying to new worlds. You see how it is one-in-the-same, from the ground up, landing on a new planet and restarting a civilization is synonymous with what we did as ancient humans. 

MK: How have you rooted in your own culture and identity in this work?

S_nya: It is a constant learning experience. Continuing to learn about it is really gratifying. It is coming to terms with how I perceive myself, that imagination: what is Black? It could be so many things. 

MK: What do you hope for the future of Missoula’s music scene?

S_nya: Missoula music gets stagnant. It is a lot of white dudes, a lot of the same kind of music, a bunch of bluegrass, psych rock is sweet, but so saturated. Whether or not they recognize diversity as necessary, a lot of people don’t understand. They know what bands are gonna bring people in and aren't taking a chance on something new. I want to push a hip-hop collective, push producers collaborating, more of a collective mentality. There is enough talent that could generate attention from regional or even national spinners and producers. We need to congregate. We need more culture, different perspectives and different ways of expression. 

MK: If there is one message in your music that you need Missoula to hear, what would that be?

S_nya: That Black just might not be what you think it is. What you know about Black people and Black history definitely isn't what you think it is. Hip-hop is not just hype, but it can be deep and have a message. Black unity is important, that message is powerful. Same with all the racial and social struggles for women and queer people, too. Representing yourself through art can have a powerful message and can make people rethink. 

 

S_nya’s “one.” celebrates Black solidarity in the Missoula community through bounding and engaged hip-hop beats. Cole Bronson is 23 years old and originally from Portland, Oregon, but he has been playing music in Missoula for the past three years. He is an emotive drummer and plays in an assortment of jazz and funk ensembles. He also has an empathic knack for producing hip-hop beats tailored perfectly for each local hip-hop artist’s individual style. We sat down to talk with S_nya about his own afrofuturistic sound collage project.

Montana Kaimin:What does “one.” mean to you?

S_nya: “one.” is Black unity and solidarity. There is crazy shit that happens to us sometimes, and we just need to talk about it. It happens to be my first project too. 

MK: What is afrofuturism?

S_nya: The idea of Black people are alien or treated as alien. The ideology was that Black people don’t belong on planet earth so we needed to go to another planet to escape. It is super powerful to imagine a utopian Black society. The album goes all the way to the past and projects all the way to the future. I pictured Black people gathering and boarding spaceships and flying to new worlds. You see how it is one-in-the-same, from the ground up, landing on a new planet and restarting a civilization is synonymous with what we did as ancient humans. 

MK: How have you rooted in your own culture and identity in this work?

S_nya: It is a constant learning experience. Continuing to learn about it is really gratifying. It is coming to terms with how I perceive myself, that imagination: what is Black? It could be so many things. 

MK: What do you hope for the future of Missoula’s music scene?

S_nya: Missoula music gets stagnant. It is a lot of white dudes, a lot of the same kind of music, a bunch of bluegrass, psych rock is sweet, but so saturated. Whether or not they recognize diversity as necessary, a lot of people don’t understand. They know what bands are gonna bring people in and aren't taking a chance on something new. I want to push a hip-hop collective, push producers collaborating, more of a collective mentality. There is enough talent that could generate attention from regional or even national spinners and producers. We need to congregate. We need more culture, different perspectives and different ways of expression. 

MK: If there is one message in your music that you need Missoula to hear, what would that be?

S_nya: That Black just might not be what you think it is. What you know about Black people and Black history definitely isn't what you think it is. Hip-hop is not just hype, but it can be deep and have a message. Black unity is important, that message is powerful. Same with all the racial and social struggles for women and queer people, too. Representing yourself through art can have a powerful message and can make people rethink. 

★★★★½