police blotter

APRIL 9: THE TROUBLE WITH CABLES

A cable lock demonstrated its uselessness after a thief easily clipped it and made off with a Neko 3 bike parked outside Knowles Hall. The student had a serial number handy, so if the thief ever gets tired of riding the bike and tries to pawn it, campus police will know, UMPD Sgt. Brad Giffin said.

MESSE AT JESSE

Officers rushed to the scene when UMPD received a call about five men hanging around Jesse Hall shouting, listening to loud rock music and smokin’, smokin’ and feeling alright mamma, they weren’t jokin’. The group moved on, however, before police could pick them up and take them away.

WHAT DREAMS MAY COME

A homeless man decided a couch at the Davidson Honors College was as good as any to catch up on some much-needed rest. Officers arrived to see him out of the building, hoping he’d find somewhere less intrusive to sleep. He only made it as far as the next blotter entry.

APRIL 10: SLEEP IS FOR THE WEAK

UMPD had to rouse the same transient from another nap, this time in the Gallagher Business Building. After telling him he had no business sleeping there or anywhere else on campus, he quietly left the grounds and the blotter for good. 

UNSMOOTH CRIMINAL

Campus police may have made breakthrough in their ongoing struggle against bike thieves after catching a man trying to pry a bike from a rack in front of the Lommasson Center. Although police didn’t issue any criminal charges, the would-be thief did receive a temporary ban from campus.

APRIL 11: WHO’S A BAD OWNER?

After somebody left their dog in their car a little too long for one bystander’s comfort, UMPD came to Lot F to investigate the negligence. The owner arrived soon after and apologized for the misstep.

APRIL 14: SICK AND TIRED

A decent lock did nothing to save a bike parked outside of the Fine Arts building. A student reported to UMPD that, although the bike remained, it was missing some parts, including the rear tire. According to Sgt. Giffin, bike parts make for ideal targets since they’re still valuable and can’t be registered into a database like the entire bike.